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“Dirty water ain’t gonna stop us putting on those Gucci clothes.”

Barking dogs are the soundtrack to a stroll down a street that bears the name of the two-time Olympic gold medallist, and undisputed middleweight world boxing champion.

As she walks, Shields, who some regard as the best women’s boxer of all time, is shouted congratulations from all sides of the road.

The 28-year-old is a legend in Flint – a city that needs a hero, advocate and spokesperson more than most.

The original home of General Motors, Flint was known as Vehicle City, but as the American motor industry declined, so did the city’s fortunes.

Flint’s population is now half what it was in its 1960s heyday and, as people have left, their tax dollars followed.

A 2014 cost-cutting decision to switch the city’s water supply from Lake Huron to the Flint River – polluted by decades of heavy industry – had disastrous consequences, exposing its people to lead poisoning and turning tap water to various shades of brown and yellow.

The city’s drinking water is now judged to be safe but the city itself is still not, with violent crime running at nearly four times the United States’ national average.

Shields keeps walking, and talking, as she drops in the Gucci analogy. It could sound flippant if it wasn’t entirely in keeping with the American’s zealous insistence that her life’s low points are to be channelled.

She believes her harrowing history – explained, named, and put out in the open – can help others.

Flint’s water crisis was far from Shields’ first challenge.

“At first, I thought my purpose was to be a great boxer. But God wanted me to be a great boxer and to tell my story because it’s going to save so many lives,” she says.

Shields is a natural storyteller. She has the words, the stories, the confidence. In a week filming for BBC Sport’s Born to Brawl series, the tales just fall out of her.

claressa-shields

She can trash talk with the best in the world – high praise in boxing, a sport which values running your mouth as much as running the show in the ring.

But, unlike a lot of her counterparts in both women’s, and men’s boxing, her narrative has depth. Unspeakably dark depths.

An extended period of sexual abuse began when Shields was just five years old.

“I’ve had to work harder than a lot of people to get to where I am,” she says. “I don’t know people who could have been in the same situations and get to where I’ve made it to…

“I’m talking about from the age of five, when I was raped as a young girl to, you know, having to deal with all the anger I had from that.

“I had a speech impediment, I couldn’t even talk till I was about six and I stuttered till I was nine.

“Flint has built that no-quit attitude in me. I remember being a kid and this girl chasing me home from school. I ran in the house and my mum was like, ‘What’s going on?’ I’m like, ‘These girls are trying to fight me’. And she was like, ‘Tomorrow when you go to school, you better fight every last one of them!’.

“And so I went to school the next day and I fought a girl at school and then I fought these other girls on the way home from school and everyone just knew don’t mess with Claressa.”

That lesson of fierce self-sufficiency was a constant for Shields. Her father went to prison when she was two and was only released when she was nine. Her mother was an alcoholic and Shields has spoken of her mother’s intermittent unexplained absences, and the constant scratching around for money.

She remembers sacrificing meals so her siblings could eat.

“Getting ready for the [London] Olympics I was growing up still in poverty,” she says. “I was 16 years old, living with my mom, me and my siblings, and you know she didn’t have it together.

“So we had a place to stay but we were still having to go some days hungry and I didn’t have a bed to sleep in.

“That’s one thing I did when I won the Olympics, first thing I did was bought me a bed.”

But, despite those early experiences, Shields’ overwhelming message is to lean into hope, not despair.

“There’s so many kids that are going through similar things I went through,” she says. “And they feel hopeless.

“But God wanted me to use my story to tell them. So they can see. Look I made it, you guys can too.

“I wouldn’t wish what I went through on my worst enemy, that’s how bad it was, and I have a few enemies.”

One is Savannah Marshall. The Briton is the only person to beat Shields across her 12-year senior career, both amateur and professional.

Claressa Shields

That defeat came at the 2012 World Championships in China, a loss followed by an unbeaten decade – and an act of revenge in October 2022 when the American beat Marshall by unanimous decision to become the undisputed middleweight champion.

Shields defended that undisputed crown against Maricela Cornejo in June, taking her pro record to 14-0, and has been clear about her feelings regarding a Marshall rematch next year: Yes, but only on US turf.

A week in the company of Shields is filled with laughs, lovable bravado and endearing showmanship – by her own admission she has the “gift of the gab as well as the gift of the jab”.

“If there’s a girl who thinks she can beat me, she better wake up and stop dreaming,” she says.

It’s also a week filled with juxtapositions. Big-fight bling and glee mixes with discussion of the complex, difficult issues behind the poverty of opportunity in her past and Flint’s present. She’s happy to celebrate and advocate for her female boxing compatriots, while also trying to beat them up. Her only unequivocal words are saved for Marshall.

“I really love all women fighters,” she adds. “Because we are all fighting the same fight and we can’t do it without each other.

“Even after the fight [against Cornejo] I had so many good things to say about her and I wanted to send her off with some advice for her future fights. I do that with most girls. The only girl I haven’t done that with is Savannah Marshall because she’s not deserving of it. She’s a B word.”

“She was probably one of our better students,” Shields’ first coach Jason Crutchfield told BBC Sport’s Born to Brawl series in a moment of serious understatement.

Crutchfield found in Shields a hurt kid. “I had bad anger issues he can tell you,” Shields admits. “There was a bit of attitude,” Crutchfield says. “It was surprising to me for her to be able to listen and execute the way that she did.”

Claressa Shields

That anger and accuracy took Shields to London 2012 and Rio 2016 gold and two undisputed world championships.

It’s a journey that is inextricably linked with Flint and everything that happened to – and in – that town while Shields was growing up.

Flint defines Shields. But her experiences there don’t define her outlook.

“Don’t let it be that because you got raped, now you hate all men, you’re angry your whole life and keep blaming this person for what they did to you,” she says.

“It’s like, that makes them the victor you know, but they’re losers.

“I always think about the guy who attacked me when I was younger.

“He couldn’t even break a five-year-old mentally.

“He attacked me, he abused me and I still turned out to be all right. It gotta suck for him.”

And with that, the cameras are off, and Shields is off too. But not before one final statement.

Predictably, over a week of conversations, interviews and memories, it is Shields who sums up best the result of her 28 years so far.

“There is more to Claressa Shields than just being the loudmouth American,” she concludes.

There sure is.

Claressa Shields is walking around her hometown of Flint, Michigan.

Barking dogs are the soundtrack to a stroll down a street that bears the name of the two-time Olympic gold medallist, and undisputed middleweight world boxing champion.

As she walks, Shields, who some regard as the best women’s boxer of all time, is shouted congratulations from all sides of the road.

The 28-year-old is a legend in Flint – a city that needs a hero, advocate and spokesperson more than most.

The original home of General Motors, Flint was known as Vehicle City, but as the American motor industry declined, so did the city’s fortunes.

Flint’s population is now half what it was in its 1960s heyday and, as people have left, their tax dollars followed.

  • WATCH: ‘I got a freaking street named after me!’ – Claressa Shields: Born to Brawl

A 2014 cost-cutting decision to switch the city’s water supply from Lake Huron to the Flint River – polluted by decades of heavy industry – had disastrous consequences, exposing its people to lead poisoning and turning tap water to various shades of brown and yellow.

The city’s drinking water is now judged to be safe but the city itself is still not, with violent crime running at nearly four times the United States’ national average.

Shields keeps walking, and talking, as she drops in the Gucci analogy. It could sound flippant if it wasn’t entirely in keeping with the American’s zealous insistence that her life’s low points are to be channelled.

She believes her harrowing history – explained, named, and put out in the open – can help others.

Flint’s water crisis was far from Shields’ first challenge.

claressa-shields

“At first, I thought my purpose was to be a great boxer. But God wanted me to be a great boxer and to tell my story because it’s going to save so many lives,” she says.

Shields is a natural storyteller. She has the words, the stories, the confidence. In a week filming for BBC Sport’s Born to Brawl series, the tales just fall out of her.

She can trash talk with the best in the world – high praise in boxing, a sport which values running your mouth as much as running the show in the ring.

But, unlike a lot of her counterparts in both women’s, and men’s boxing, her narrative has depth. Unspeakably dark depths.

An extended period of sexual abuse began when Shields was just five years old.

“I’ve had to work harder than a lot of people to get to where I am,” she says. “I don’t know people who could have been in the same situations and get to where I’ve made it to…

“I’m talking about from the age of five, when I was raped as a young girl to, you know, having to deal with all the anger I had from that.

“I had a speech impediment, I couldn’t even talk till I was about six and I stuttered till I was nine.

“Flint has built that no-quit attitude in me. I remember being a kid and this girl chasing me home from school. I ran in the house and my mum was like, ‘What’s going on?’ I’m like, ‘These girls are trying to fight me’. And she was like, ‘Tomorrow when you go to school, you better fight every last one of them!’.

“And so I went to school the next day and I fought a girl at school and then I fought these other girls on the way home from school and everyone just knew don’t mess with Claressa.”

That lesson of fierce self-sufficiency was a constant for Shields. Her father went to prison when she was two and was only released when she was nine. Her mother was an alcoholic and Shields has spoken of her mother’s intermittent unexplained absences, and the constant scratching around for money.

She remembers sacrificing meals so her siblings could eat.

“Getting ready for the [London] Olympics I was growing up still in poverty,” she says. “I was 16 years old, living with my mom, me and my siblings, and you know she didn’t have it together.

claressa-shields

“So we had a place to stay but we were still having to go some days hungry and I didn’t have a bed to sleep in.

“That’s one thing I did when I won the Olympics, first thing I did was bought me a bed.”

But, despite those early experiences, Shields’ overwhelming message is to lean into hope, not despair.

“There’s so many kids that are going through similar things I went through,” she says. “And they feel hopeless.

“But God wanted me to use my story to tell them. So they can see. Look I made it, you guys can too.

“I wouldn’t wish what I went through on my worst enemy, that’s how bad it was, and I have a few enemies.”

One is Savannah Marshall. The Briton is the only person to beat Shields across her 12-year senior career, both amateur and professional.

That defeat came at the 2012 World Championships in China, a loss followed by an unbeaten decade – and an act of revenge in October 2022 when the American beat Marshall by unanimous decision to become the undisputed middleweight champion.

Shields defended that undisputed crown against Maricela Cornejo in June, taking her pro record to 14-0, and has been clear about her feelings regarding a Marshall rematch next year: Yes, but only on US turf.

A week in the company of Shields is filled with laughs, lovable bravado and endearing showmanship – by her own admission she has the “gift of the gab as well as the gift of the jab”.

“If there’s a girl who thinks she can beat me, she better wake up and stop dreaming,” she says.

It’s also a week filled with juxtapositions. Big-fight bling and glee mixes with discussion of the complex, difficult issues behind the poverty of opportunity in her past and Flint’s present. She’s happy to celebrate and advocate for her female boxing compatriots, while also trying to beat them up. Her only unequivocal words are saved for Marshall.

“I really love all women fighters,” she adds. “Because we are all fighting the same fight and we can’t do it without each other.

“Even after the fight [against Cornejo] I had so many good things to say about her and I wanted to send her off with some advice for her future fights. I do that with most girls. The only girl I haven’t done that with is Savannah Marshall because she’s not deserving of it. She’s a B word.”

“She was probably one of our better students,” Shields’ first coach Jason Crutchfield told BBC Sport’s Born to Brawl series in a moment of serious understatement.

Crutchfield found in Shields a hurt kid. “I had bad anger issues he can tell you,” Shields admits. “There was a bit of attitude,” Crutchfield says. “It was surprising to me for her to be able to listen and execute the way that she did.”

That anger and accuracy took Shields to London 2012 and Rio 2016 gold and two undisputed world championships.

It’s a journey that is inextricably linked with Flint and everything that happened to – and in – that town while Shields was growing up.

Flint defines Shields. But her experiences there don’t define her outlook.

“Don’t let it be that because you got raped, now you hate all men, you’re angry your whole life and keep blaming this person for what they did to you,” she says.

“It’s like, that makes them the victor you know, but they’re losers.

“I always think about the guy who attacked me when I was younger.

“He couldn’t even break a five-year-old mentally.

“He attacked me, he abused me and I still turned out to be all right. It gotta suck for him.”

And with that, the cameras are off, and Shields is off too. But not before one final statement.

Predictably, over a week of conversations, interviews and memories, it is Shields who sums up best the result of her 28 years so far.

“There is more to Claressa Shields than just being the loudmouth American,” she concludes.

The iconic ‘Rumble in the Jungle’ unfolded on October 30, 1974, in Kinshasa, Zaire, marking a historic moment in boxing history. Muhammad Ali, hailing from Louisville, Kentucky, clinched victory against defending champion George Foreman from Houston, Texas, thus reclaiming the world heavyweight title. The ‘Rumble in the Jungle’ garnered global attention. Now promoter Dmitry Salita wants a similar thing to happen for the 2x undisputed champion Claressa Shields.

The mastermind behind making this spectacle a reality was Cleveland-born promoter Don King. King’s persuasive efforts convinced Zaire’s dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko, to sponsor the fight, bringing international focus to Zaire. The success of the Rumble in the Jungle solidified Ali’s legacy as ‘The Greatest’. In an exclusive conversation with Sky Sports, Shields’ promoter Dmitry Salita talked about how he wants the same thing to happen to Shields, as it did with Muhammad Ali.

In the interview, Salita said, “To go to Africa, like Muhammad Ali did, to have a significant fight there would be worldwide news, another step in her career that would transcend the sport of boxing and be great for its growth.” Salita believes it would be an important statement made around the world regarding the sport of boxing. Moreover, Salita believes that such events transcend the sport to another level, and he’d love to see Shields having a fight either in the Middle East or in Africa. He stated, “We’d love for that to happen at some point down the line. Not too far down the line, hopefully.

Not only this, the promoter also hinted towards the most-anticipated rematch between Claressa Shields and Savannah Marshall. He firmly believes that this would be a perfect fight for such an occasion, with both boxers running it back again for their fans.

Muhammad Ali | Watch on PBS Wisconsin

In a historic moment for women’s sports, the all-women boxing card achieved a groundbreaking milestone with over two million viewers. This was one of the largest audiences for a live women’s sports event. The highlight of this monumental occasion was the clash between Shields and Marshall, a bout that captured the essence of top-tier boxing. Shields secured her place in history by defeating Marshall through a unanimous decision.

Shields also earned the title of the undisputed middleweight world champion. So, Salita wants to do the fight again, as he said, “Their rivalry’s so great whatever they do, if they play chess, people are going to want to see it. I believe 10 out of 10 times Claressa wins the fight but Savannah is a very good fighter. I believe that fight is always going to be entertaining and exciting.” So, Shields’ promoter very well understands what the public needs.

It does make sense that Salita would want to do the fight between Shields and Marshall again since they garnered so much of an audience with their last showdown. Would you want to see their rematch? Tell us in the comments section.

If all goes according to plan, Claressa Shields hopes one day to be fighting against all-time great Cris Cyborg in MMA.

The highly decorated boxing champion and two-time Olympic gold medalist knows there’s a long road ahead to get to that point, but if it was up to her, Cyborg would be her ideal matchup in MMA. The possibility of a Shields-Cyborg bout did become a little more real now that the PFL, for which Shields fights in MMA, purchased Bellator, which is Cyborg’s home.

“The fight that I see – it’s the scariest fight for me in MMA – would be me vs. Cris Cyborg,” Shields told MMA Junkie Radio. “She’s a GOAT in MMA, and I’m a GOAT in boxing, and we both have multiple world titles in our field.

“I feel that fight right there would be the biggest fight and a fight that I would get up for. Listen, I would get up for a fight against Kayla Harrison or Larissa Pacheco. Those girls are badasses and good at what they do. But Cris just seems like she’s the beast. … If I had to pick a dream fight, it would be against her. I feel she’s better than Kayla and Larissa.”

Shields is one of the most accomplished women’s boxers in history. Many have the same regard for Cyborg in MMA.

Shields is only 1-1 in MMA, and hasn’t stepped back in the cage since her first professional loss in October 2021. Although she’s yet to go far in her MMA career, and her dream matchup is against Cyborg, the main goal is a championship.

Claressa Shields talks about becoming the greatest female boxer in ESPN's  Body Issue — Andscape

“I would like to become PFL champion,” Shields said. “I believe that is doable. I believe that it’s possible for me. Give me some years of training of just me making MMA a priority. I believe that I can be a PFL and boxing world champion at the same time. I know it’s big, but I feel like it’s achievable, 100 percent, for me.”

Shields expects to resume her fighting career in the cage early 2024.

“It’s looking like February or maybe April,” Shields said. “I’ve been training MMA with Murcielago Team in Lansing (Mich.) for the past few months, and I’ll continue training with them. I’ve been learning a lot. … I’m getting stronger in those fields that I’m not strong. I can’t say I’m strong on the ground, but I will be. I’m stronger than I was, so I’m just going to keep building from there. … I’ve just been grinding and working hard, so I believe February or April you’ll see me back in the PFL SmartCage.”

Claressa Shields has furiously hit back at Arturs Ahmetovs after he leaked a video of himself flooring her in sparring.

The little-known Latvian boxer took to social media to post the clip in response to the American world champion’s claim that he had removed the padding from his gloves before the session to ‘cheat’ and knock her down.

The spar took place back in 2018, prior to Shields’ fight with Hanna Gabriels.

She was famously knocked down in that bout, and has said these two knockdowns within a short timespan are the only times she has ever touched the canvas.

Ahmetovs captioned the clip: “It’s nice that you remember me @ClaressaShields.

“If you think that I dishonoured you, as an honest person I’m ready to merry.”

And his coach Derik Santos commented: “She is full of s***, they asked for help to spar why would we want to spar a women?

“No-one took padding out of the gloves. After she was accusing of this the gloves were handed to her coach.

“But more importantly she sparred two rounds prior where Artur was instructed not to hit her hard, while he was working with her she started talking mad s*** at him and fouling him to point she tripped him.

“In the break he said, ‘What is going on here? We are trying to help, she is a woman.’

claressa-shields

“What was replied was, ‘Well, punch her back, she is a big girl, multi-time champ.’

“He even tried to help her up, nobody wanted that to happen. This also happened years ago and obviously the video was kept never seen.

“Even through all the comments [where she said] she would beat a [male boxer], nothing was said derogatory towards her or spoken of this moment.

“Now she went to talking and he posted it. Now this is going to go around.

Shields blasted back: “You know damn well the gloves didn’t have padding’ Harold Calderon said the same thing!

“You went to hide the gloves in you bag! I checked them because I was puzzled on how I got dropped! I’ve never been dropped! So you a damn liar and cheat!

“John David Jackson and Harold Calderon both checked the gloves and it was no padding! You are a cheat!”

Shields also took to social media herself and added: “I’ve never been KO’d in 17 years and I’ve been dropped two times, all in a week of each other. I have no shame in that.

“But for a male fighter to literally take the padding out his gloves, he’s a punk. Him and coach Derrick Santos are bad for the sport!”

Undisputed middleweight champion Claressa Shields has a new opponent on June 3 after Hanna Gabriels tested positive for a banned substance.

Per a copy of the Voluntary Anti-Doping Agency report obtained by Sports Illustrated‘s Chris Mannix, Gabriels’ sample returned positive for clostebol, a testosterone derivative.

Gabriels was set to be the first challenger for Shields since she became the undisputed middleweight champion.

The undefeated two-time Olympic gold medalist defeated Savannah Marshall on Oct. 15 to retain the WBA, WBC, IBF, WBF, and The Ring titles and win the WBO belt.

Shields and Gabriels agreed to a rematch of their 2018 bout in April. The original fight was also in Detroit at the Masonic Temple, with Shields winning the 10-round showdown by unanimous decision.

Gabriels has fought only three times in the past five years since that loss. She is 3-0 during that span, but her last match was in April 2021 against Martha Gaytán. The Costa Rican star won the inaugural WBA light heavyweight title and vacant WBC heavyweight title by defeating Gaytán.

Claressa Shields defeats Hanna Gabriels

 

Cornejo will be making her return to the ring after a 21-month layoff. She defeated Miranda Barber via unanimous decision in September 2021. The 36-year-old has a 14-5 career record and is the third-ranked women’s middleweight fighter, per ESPN’s Michael Rothstein.

ESPN.com has Shields ranked as the best pound-for-pound women’s boxer in the world. She is 13-0 in her professional career and has five gold medals between the Olympics, World Championships and Pan American Games.

Claressa Shields is perhaps in the prime of her career, establishing a big enough name as a two-time Olympic gold medalist and world champion in three weight classes to headline the first boxing card in the six-year history of Detroit’s Little Caesars Arena.

The undisputed middleweight champion became the first woman to earn a seven-figure payday in her last two fights and made another $1 million on Saturday night when she beat top-ranked contender Maricela Cornejo at the home of the Detroit Red Wings and Pistons.

Shields grew up poor in Flint, Michigan, and has earned enough money to become rich at 28. Still, she laments the gender inequities in boxing.

“We don’t get the equal TV time, the equal promotion, equal pay. And that’s what I’ve been trying to do with my platform and make sure that I get all of that,” Shields said earlier this week in an interview with The Associated Press.

Shields is boxing in a marquee event in part because sports-streaming service DAZN stepped up enough financially to facilitate the fight.

Women in boxing have shown they can sell out big arenas, as Katie Taylor and Amanda Serrano did 13 months ago at New York’s Madison Square Garden, but they’re not compensated as well as men in the same sport.

“It’s like any other profession where the women still haven’t caught up,” said Jackie Kallen, a 77-year-old former boxing publicist and manager who was commissioner of the International Female Boxing Association. “They take a beating just like the men. They bleed just like the men, but they don’t get paid just like the men.”

Shields is 13-0 with two knockouts. She turned pro in 2016 after becoming the first U.S. boxer of any gender to win consecutive Olympic gold medals and is averaging two fights a year.

Shields also is on a mission to be recognized as the “Greatest Woman Of All Time,” or the “GWOAT,” now and in the future.

“People that say that women’s boxing don’t have fans, well, they’re going to be mad Saturday,” she said.

The Undisputed boxing video game announced its sixth improvement, releasing a new Women’s Revolution Update.

Undisputed announced on social media on Dec. 7 that the Women’s Revolution Update was now complete, adding four female fighters and one new venue to the game. As a part of the renovation, female boxers Claressa Shields, Heather Hardy, Seniesa Estrada, and Franchon Crews-Dezurn are now playable characters.

Per the update release, Shields and Crews-Dezurn will be included in the women’s welterweight division, while Hardy and Estrada will join the women’s lightweight division. The game also announced improved visual damage and AI updates in their Instagram post.

The game is currently available on all gaming platforms after initially being released on Jan. 31.

Who is Claressa Shields fighting next?

After defending her undisputed middleweight title against Maricela Conejo in June, Claressa Shields announced that she would re-sign with the PFL and make a return to MMA.

Despite being on top of the boxing world, Shields is just 1-1 as a professional MMA fighter, with both fights in the PFL smart cage. The ‘GWOAT’ enjoyed a successful comeback TKO win in her debut but would lose her next fight by split decision to Abigail Montes.

Since the loss to Montes in 2021, Claressa Shields has not competed in MMA since but has defended her boxing titles three more times. In the same time frame, Shields told declared in ESPN interviews that she would devote more of her time to training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu, even claiming she could become a BJJ black belt in just two years.

Claressa Shields: 'I grew up hearing that women can't fight. I'm ready to  show how wrong that is.' | Boxing News

While Shields’ next MMA opponent has not been announced, there are more options for her in 2024 than there were in 2021. With the PFL’s recent acquisition of Bellator, the pool of potential opponents for the top pound-for-pound female boxer has opened up.

Having already been briefly linked to PFL star Kayla Harrison, Shields has also engaged in a back-and-forth with Bellator featherweight champion Cris Cyborg. All three women are now in the same promotion, along with PFL featherweight champion Larissa Pacheco.

The long-awaited return of Deontay Wilder is nearly over! The ‘Bronze Bomber’ will grace the square ring on 23 December against Joseph Parker in Kingdom Arena, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Recently, a training clip of the Tuscaloosa resident for the Parker fight camp surfaced online, leaving fans and experts awe-struck. One of those experts, a popular name in boxing – Claressa Shields.

Wilder has been out of the ring since his last fight against Robert Helenius, where he won the match via first-round knockout. However, Wilder’s performance wasn’t nearly as good in his three prior fights against Tyson Fury. So, the boxing world had speculated a sensational return to the ring against someone like Anthony Joshua. While that’s not the case, it’s a return nonetheless. So, when the clip went live on Instagram – fans poured in to hype up Wilder.

Turning to Instagram, the 43-2-1 Heavyweight shared the clip alongside a message. He wrote, “You can do anything in this world. You just have to want to do it. Let’s gooooooooo *f!” Since the post went live on the platform, it has collected over 19K hearts and nearly 900 comments.

claressa sheilds

 

While other users praised Wilder’s moves, Claressa ‘The GOAT’ Shields decided to comment on the music used in the clip. “The song is [fire emoji],” wrote Shields.

One user claimed Wilder will prove his haters wrong in the upcoming fight. The user commented, “Wilder gonna shut you haters up. BombSquad forever.”

Another user questioned how Wilder is able to move like that. “Why is a heavyweight moving like that,” wrote the user.

Someone else suggested Wilder’s power and agility is unparalleled. “Yo, power and agility is unstoppable,” remarked the user.

The next user claimed Wilder was too fast and strong. “Too strong, too fast,” the user wrote. While fans sing praises for the ‘Bronze Bomber,’ Otto Wallin suggests Wilder might face issues defeating Parker.

Life changes as fame grows for Flint Olympic gold medal boxer Claressa Shields

Flint boxer Claressa Shields is tastefully featured in the latest ESPN The Magazine Body Issue. Jake May | MLive.com

FLINT, MI – Olympic boxer Claressa Shields said she didn’t always view herself as the best-looking girl growing up on the north side of Flint.

Some of her classmates bullied and picked on her, but as her boxing talent continued to emerge so did her confidence in her physical frame.

Now her nude physique is tastefully featured in the latest ESPN The Magazine Body Issue.

ESPN revealed the photos of all 19 athletes for this year’s magazine on Wednesday morning.

The 21-year-old joins notable athletes such as Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade, UFC fighter Conor McGregor, and Super Bowl MVP Von Miller for the issue, which hits newsstands on July 8.

This is the eighth annual edition of the Body Issue, but for Shields the photos were more meaningful than displaying her body to the world.
“I agreed to do Body because I wanted to show my beautiful side and my strong side,” Shields told ESPN. “With me being a boxer, I always look mean, and all you really focus on is my fist.
“I wanted to show that even though I’m in a male-dominated sport, I’m still a woman – a very strong woman!”